The Hubris of Western Science

Target Malaria plans to introduce genetically modified mosquitoes to a remote village in Burkina Faso. Why do we need to be concerned?

Image result for Aedes Aegypti Mosquito.

Africa is a Country, August 2018

Few people need convincing that malaria is a deadly and terrible disease. The World Health Organization estimates that half of the world’s population is at risk, with 445,000 deaths recorded in 2016, most of which were in Sub-Saharan Africa. Young children and pregnant women are particularly at risk in areas with high transmission, and, although malaria has been on the global radar for decades, the World Health Organization recently noted a “troubling shift in the trajectory of the disease” with progress in reducing transmission and fatalities having stalled at the end of 2016.Prevention and treatment methods have included insecticide treated mosquito nets, sprays, and anti-malarial drugs. Now, proponents of a new technology claim they can supposedly eliminate the disease at its source, in the very DNA of malaria-transmitting mosquitoes. It sounds fictitious, but that is the objective of Target Malaria, a research consortium that receives its core funding, $92 million, from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and from the Open Philanthropy Project, funded largely by Facebook co-founder Dustin Moskovitz.Target Malaria claims that there is a consensus “that new tools are needed to eliminate malaria.” Their “new tool” is a gene drive, a speculative technique intended to engineer the genetics of entire populations of the malaria-transmitting Anopheles gambiae species by a single release of an organism with engineered genes. Target Malaria aims to create strains of genetically modified female mosquitoes: essential genes for fertility are cut, preventing them from having female offspring or from having offspring altogether. These modified mosquitoes will be rigged to then pass on their genes to a high percentage of their offspring, supposedly spreading auto-extinction genes throughout the population.Target Malaria’s project focuses on four countries: Burkina Faso, Mali, Uganda and Kenya. The project is most active in Burkina Faso: in 2016, genetically modified mosquitoes were exported to the country from Imperial College in London for contained experiments, with approval from the National Biosecurity Agency. The Institut de Recherche en Sciences de la Santé (IRSS) in Burkina Faso, part of the Target Malaria consortium, plans to release the GM mosquitoes into the environment between July and November 2018 in one of three villages of Bana, Pala ou Sourkoudiguin. The consortium says it is planning a phased approach; in the first phase, it will release 10,000 “male-sterile” (non-gene drive) mosquitoes; in the second, another non-gene drive mosquito will be released into the open, to bias the mosquito population to be male only; in the third and final phase, the gene drive mosquitoes will be released, involving either male bias or female infertility.

Behind gene drive technology

International media coverage of Target Malaria’s project has been substantial, revealing the ubiquitous technophilia that characterizes so much of today’s responses to these kinds of new innovations. Little of this coverage however, has looked at who is behind research on gene drives or questioned their premise.

The gene drive files, a trove of emails and records discovered by civil society organizations and released in December 2017, reveal that it is in fact the US Military that has taken the lead in pushing forward research on gene drives. According to the records, The US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has given approximately $100 million for gene drive and related research, making it the largest funder of gene drive research, and it “either funds or coordinates with almost all major players working on gene drive development as well as the key holders of patents on CRISPR gene editing technology.” The files also uncovered “an extremely high level of interest and activity by other sections of the US military and intelligence community” in gene drives. 

It’s not just the US Military that was subjected to scrutiny: the gene drive files found that a gene drive “advocacy coalition,” was run by a private PR firm that received $1.6 million in funds from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and seem to have used covert lobbying tactics to influence UN discussion on gene drives. And while Target Malaria has emphasized their independence from any military agendas, it has since become apparent that Target Malaria’s Andrea Crisanti, who developed the modified mosquitoes at Imperial College is also funded by DARPA’s Safe Genes project.

(Un)Intended consequences?

If the  source of funding for Target Malaria’s experiments and their relationship to DARPA is not worrying enough, there are myriad other reasons to be wary of gene drive technologies, however well-meaning the target. For one thing, gene drives rely upon the new and poorly understood gene editing technique CRISPR-Cas9. Many of the consequences of such gene editing techniques are yet unknown.

The short sighted hubris of altering wild insects populations is also cause for concern. It is a tendency of science and research in the Western world to treat issues in isolation, as if one part has no relationship to larger webs of complex interconnection. Although controlling mosquitoes is supposedly about one strain of a single species, scientists have warned that there are dangers in the unintended consequences of altering one part of a complex ecosystem—a decrease in one species for instance often leads to an increase in another or a loss of important functions (such as pollination), or alternatively, a gene drive could spread between species causing potentially devastating effects. 

These are not just hypothetical concerns. In Panama for instance, following programs that targeted Aedes agyptae mosquitoes using fumigation methods and limited releases of GM mosquitoes by UK Biotech company Oxitec, there was a rise in numbers of the Asian Tiger mosquitoes.

Simple evolution is very likely to outwit too-clever-by-half schemes. Edward Blumenthal, the Chair of Biological Sciences at Marquette University has noted that the anopheles mosquito species may develop a mutation (a phenomena known as ‘gene drive resistance’ is already being noted), preventing the gene drive method from working, or the malaria parasite could find a different host. Researchers have also warned that “a gene drive would be remarkably aggressive,” likely giving rise to invasive species and that real world experiments are “extremely risky.” And, even when a gene drive is applied in one country, neighboring countries would become part of the experiment, “whether they like it or not.” Gene drives and winged insects do not respect national borders.

In addition to impacts on natural ecosystems, there are the very real fears of how gene editing technologies will fare in a world characterized by widening inequalities, violence and warfare in many countries, ecological crises, and a rise in far-right and fascist movements. In today’s social and political climate, being able to genetically engineer undesired species seems just a few steps away from the possibilities of eugenics and certainly opens the way to hostile uses against food sources. The US President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology warned the White House directly about the possibility of editing genes and turning viruses or infectious agents into diseases for which no treatment exists.

Burkina Faso as a ‘Guinea Pig’ for experimentation

Within Burkina Faso, a number of groups have been mobilizing in opposition to Target Malaria’s project. This is not the first time Burkina Faso has experimented with genetic modification: In 2008, when the country’s cotton crop was being devoured by pests, it introduced GM seeds for BT cotton produced by Monsanto (now Bayer). The resulting cotton was pest free but of lower quality. As the GM cotton lost its premium pricing, the impact was a drop in the value of its output.

On June 2, 2018, the organization Collectif citoyen pour l’agro-écologie, together with hundreds of peasants and farmers gathered in Ouagadougou, holding banners that said: “Stop and desist: GMO, BT cowpea, genetically modified mosquito,” and “Monsanto, Target Malaria and Bill Gates: respect Africa’s right to self-determination.” These groups want the risks of GM technologies to be properly evaluated and a moratorium on gene drives put in place in the meantime.

Leaving aside the problem of the unintended consequences of the released mosquitoes, there are also enormously unequal power dynamics at play in which a consortium funded mostly by powerful foreign institutions is introducing a new technology developed in a lab in the UK to be released in a rural community in West Africa. It is not surprising that the group COPAGEN, (Collective pour la protection du patrimoine génetique Africain), has publicly denounced Target Malaria’s use of Burkina Faso for its experiments saying that “Burkinabes are being used like guinea pigs” and has appealed to the National Centre for Biosecurity not to authorize the release of the mosquitoes.

Indeed, although Target Malaria has insisted that it works with local communities and obtains their consent before releasing the mosquitoes, it is difficult to see how is possible if, as a few people have pointed out, there reportedly exists no word for a “gene” in local languages. Interviews with inhabitants of the targeted villages indicate that their inhabitants do not really understand how the gene drives work. Gene drive technology is already very difficult for a general public to understand, let alone rural communities who may not have sufficient information about the origins and details of malaria transmission. What in that case constitutes consent? Groups including Third World Network, the African Centre for Biodiversity and ETC Group state that this is a particularly important issue given that Burkina Faso’s biosafety regulation does not have specific guidance for conducting risk assessment for GM mosquitoes, and it is unclear what kind of public consultation is required.

Bringing these concerns to the forefront of high level negotiations around gene drives has been challenging for civil society groups. Last month in Montreal, at the Subsidiary Body on Scientific, Technical and Technological Advice (SBSTTA-22), where government delegates from around the world meet to discuss key issues on biodiversity, the Target Malaria consortium had a representative, Elinor Chemonges, whose role was simultaneously to represent the government of Uganda in a clear conflict of interest.

Target Malaria resembles many of the technical “solutions” that western philanthropists and multinational corporations come up with to solve the social and environmental problems facing our world: from schemes like carbon credits designed to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, to geoengineering projects to solve climate change (which Bill Gates has also incidentally invested in), there is no shortage of speculative technical fixes presented to solve myriad serious problems that we are faced with today, and which obviate the need to deal with their structural causes.

It is noteworthy that Paraguay, and before that, Sri Lanka, eliminated malaria entirely without western scientists in lab coats fidgeting with mosquito DNA. The World Health Organization predicts that Algeria, Argentina and Uzbekistan could be malaria-free later this year. If such strides are currently being made, imagine what possibilities exist if an equivalent sum to $92 million were spent strengthening public health care systems in West Africa, as well as tracking malaria cases and preventing outbreaks, as was done in Paraguay.

If there are any lessons that as Africans we should learn from the past, it’s to be wary of technological interventions that claim to be saving African lives, especially when they are supported and funded by, among others, wealthy western philanthrocapitalists and the US Military.

The hubris of western neoliberal capitalism and its attendant belief that we can master and control nature without end is in large part to blame for the current social and ecological crises we are in today. The only way out of these crises, whether it is climate change or malaria, is to dismantle this very ideology, to create space for indigenous science and knowledge in the path we forge toward the future, and to consider the existing solutions that have been there all along.

Howard Buffett au Congo: Le problème de la philanthropie capitaliste

La colonisation n’en finit pas de sévir, et si l’occupation militaire des territoires n’est plus en vogue pour les pays occidentaux, d’autres moyens leur sont offerts pour asseoir leur position sur nombre de pays. La philanthropie, que l’on pourrait croire armée des meilleures intentions, fait partie des nouvelles formes de ce libéralisme postcolonial : en inondant les États et les structures locales de dollars, les grands investisseurs capitalistes noient dans l’œuf toutes les initiatives pour l’autonomie et la résistance des peuples autochtones. Pour exemple, voici le cas du businessman Howard Buffett, fils de Warren Buffett (troisième fortune mondiale), qui joue un rôle non négligeable dans le « développement » de la République démocratique du Congo et vient influencer les récits des journalistes ou des ONG là où aboutit son financement.

Texte original : « The Problem With Capitalist Philanthropy », Jacobin le 6 février 2018.
Traduction par Édouard Batot

Télécharger l’article en PDF.

Jef Klak, Mai 2018

En 2015, alors que je participais à un séjour de reportage avec la Fondation Internationale des Femmes pour les Médias (IWMF) dans la République démocratique du Congo (RDC), un journaliste local m’avait prévenue : « C’est difficile d’aller où que ce soit dans l’est du pays sans toucher un des projets de Howard Buffett. » En effet, ayant investi dans une série d’initiatives comprenant des centrales hydroélectriques 1, le développement routier 2 et l’écotourisme 3, Howard Buffett est considérablement impliqué dans cette région. Le photographe, agriculteur, shérif, ancien directeur de la compagnie Coca-Cola, et fils du troisième homme le plus riche du monde, a versé des millions dans la région.

Le projet hydroélectrique a été la première étape d’un programme d’investissement mis en place conjointement par l’autorité congolaise des parcs nationaux (ICCN) et la Fondation Virunga, une organisation caritative britannique. En 2015, Buffett aurait promis 39 millions de dollars supplémentaires pour deux autres centrales électriques, et la Fondation Virunga prévoit de financer plus de centrales, d’hôtels et de projets d’infrastructure autour du parc au cours des prochaines années. Dans une interview accordée à Reuters, le directeur du parc, Emmanuel de Merode, a déclaré que ces initiatives, en particulier les centrales électriques, créeraient des opportunités d’emploi pour les communautés entourant le parc.

Et les investissements de Buffett ne s’arrêtent pas là ; de l’autre côté de la frontière, au Rwanda, sa fondation a déclaré en 2015 qu’elle investissait 500 millions de dollars sur dix ans afin de « transformer » l’agriculture du pays « en un secteur plus productif, à forte valeur et plus directement axé sur le marché ». Jusqu’à présent, la fondation s’est concentrée sur des projets de sécurité alimentaire, avec 67,5 % de ses contributions de 2015 bénéficiant à ce secteur 4.

Ces investissements semblent louables. Qui peut s’opposer à l’amélioration de la sécurité alimentaire dans le Rwanda rural ou à la construction de centrales hydroélectriques dans la région du Kivu en RDC, où l’infrastructure de base est limitée et où seulement 3 % de la population a accès à l’électricité ? Quelle meilleure façon de soutenir la région qu’en finançant des centrales électriques et en empêchant les gens d’abattre des arbres pour le charbon de bois ?

Pour répondre à ces questions, il faut d’abord demander : qui exactement est cet Howard Buffett ?

La philanthropie capitaliste et ses conséquences

Howard Buffett, comme Bill Gates 5, appartient au club fermé des « philanthropes capitalistes 6 » qui investissent leur richesse dans la résolution des problèmes majeurs du monde dans des domaines comme la santé et l’agriculture. La déclaration de mission de la Fondation Howard G. Buffett explique que ses investissements « catalysent le changement transformationnel, en particulier pour les populations les plus pauvres et les plus marginalisées du monde 7  ».

Bien que les philanthropes disent aider les démuni·es, Jens Martens et Karoline Seitz ont documenté 8 comment le don de bienfaisance profite également aux riches 9. De riches hommes d’affaires ont créé les toutes premières fondations américaines au début du XXe siècle pour échapper à l’impôt, acquérir du prestige et se faire entendre dans les affaires mondiales. Depuis lors, les philanthropes occupent une position de plus en plus dominante dans le développement économique, influençant tant les gouvernements que les organisations internationales 10.

Les philanthropes capitalistes opèrent au carrefour de la charité, du capitalisme et du développement 11. Comme l’écrit le professeur à l’université de Bradford (Angleterre) Behrooz Morvaridi, ils sont « politiquement et idéologiquement engagés dans une approche de marché 12 ». En investissant de vastes sommes d’argent pour résoudre des problèmes sociaux complexes, élargir le secteur privé et investir dans des solutions techniques, ils avancent l’idée que le capitalisme n’est pas la cause, mais au contraire la solution aux problèmes du monde. Selon les mots de l’historien Mikkel Thorup, la philanthropie capitaliste brouille les cartes dans le conflit qui oppose riches et pauvres, affirmant plutôt que les riches sont « les meilleurs et, peut-être, les seuls amis des pauvres 13  ».

Mais les problèmes que les philanthropes capitalistes prétendent résoudre sont enracinés dans le même système économique qui leur permet de générer une richesse aussi importante en premier lieu. Martens et Seitz montrent que les dons de bienfaisance représentent « l’autre face de l’inégalité croissante entre riches et pauvres  » : ils révèlent une corrélation directe entre « l’accumulation de richesse accrue, les mesures fiscales régressives et le financement des activités philanthropiques » 14.

Dans son livre No Is Not Enough, Naomi Klein écrit qu’au cours des deux dernières décennies, l’élite libérale s’est « tournée vers la classe des milliardaires pour résoudre les problèmes » qui étaient auparavant abordés « avec une action collective et un secteur public fort » 15. En effet, les solutions proposées par les philanthropes capitalistes dans des domaines comme la santé, l’éducation et l’agriculture érodent les dépenses du secteur public et détournent l’attention des causes structurelles de la pauvreté. Dans l’agriculture, on peut recenser, parmi les obstacles structurels, des accords de libéralisation des échanges qui suppriment les droits d’importation et permettent aux pays riches d’acheter des produits à bas prix, ou encore laccaparement généralisé des terres agricoles 16 qui, en 2016, s’est traduit par près de 500 transactions affectant 30 millions d’hectares de terre 17.

Buffett a critiqué l’imposition du modèle américain d’agriculture industrielle en Afrique, que d’autres philanthropes, comme Bill Gates, défendent 18. Néanmoins, ses investissements dans l’est du Congo et au Rwanda sont conçus pour soutenir des systèmes axés sur les « lois du marché ». Il a collaboré avec Partners for Seed in Africa (PASA) et Program for Africa’s Seed Systems (PASS) : soutiens incontournables des entreprises semencières qui vendent des semences hybrides et des engrais synthétiques aux agriculteurs et agricultrices 19. Une pratique de privatisation du vivant qui détruit les pratiques ancestrales des agriculteurs (préservation, partage et échange de semences, promotion de la diversité biologique 20). Les deux programmes font partie de la controversée Alliance pour une Révolution Verte en Afrique, que les petit·es agriculteurs/agricultrices et les éleveurs/éleveuses de différents pays africains dénoncent 21 pour son soutien aux grandes entreprises accusées d’« utiliser la propriété intellectuelle pour établir le contrôle des semences par les entreprises  ».

Avec Bill Gates, Howard Buffett a investi 47 millions de dollars dans un projet en partenariat avec Monsanto 22 pour développer des variétés de maïs économes en eau pour les petit·es paysan·nes 23. Les critiques ont reproché au géant de l’agronomie d’essayer de transférer la propriété de « la culture du maïs, la production de graines et sa commercialisation… dans le secteur privé », forçant ainsi « les petit⋅es agricultrices et agriculteurs à adopter des variétés hybrides de maïs, leurs engrais synthétiques et leurs pesticides » qui profitent en fin de compte aux entreprises semencières et agrochimiques 24.

L’ironie est à son comble quand on sait que Howard Buffet a d’abord siégé au conseil d’administration de Coca-Cola (qui a financé des chercheur·es pour minimiser son impact néfaste sur la santé 25) avant de décider de comment les paysan·nes en Afrique devraient cultiver leur terre. Sans oublier que Buffett a également siégé au conseil d’administration du géant de l’alimentation Conagra Foods, accusé d’enfreindre les codes du travail et de l’environnement 26.

La conservation est l’autre grande priorité de Buffett. Certains ont décrit le Parc national des Virunga, véritable chouchou des médias actuellement en partenariat avec la Fondation Buffett, comme un « État dans l’État 27 ». Bien qu’il protège la biodiversité de la région contre le braconnage et l’exploration pétrolière, la création de ce site a également dépossédé les habitant·es originel·les de la région, et ses gardes paramilitaires sont accusés d’avoir brutalisé les communautés autochtones à la périphérie du parc. Couverte d’éloges dans la presse, la centrale hydroélectrique du parc a pourtant suscité de vives controverses récemment. Certain·es habitant·es se plaignent en effet de l’explosion des prix de l’électricité produite par l’usine, passant de de 5 $ à 50 $ pour un usage domestique de base 28. Ces revendications ont été contestées par Save Virunga, un groupe qui soutient le Parc national des Virunga 29.

Buffett a également financé des pourparlers de paix entre les rebelles du M23 et le gouvernement congolais en Ouganda, à un niveau d’ingérence qui révèle l’influence des philanthropes sur les décisions politiques 30. Quand un rapport du groupe d’experts de l’ONU a constaté que le gouvernement rwandais soutenait les rebelles du M23, Buffett a plaidé contre la suspension de l’aide au pays 31. Bien qu’elle se décrit elle-même comme une « entité non politique », sa fondation a néanmoins publié un rapport qui discrédite les conclusions du groupe d’experts et remet en question sa fiabilité 32.

C’est en ce sens que l’essayiste David Rieff souligne 33 que le projet philanthro-capitaliste est « irrémédiablement non-démocratique » sinon « antidémocratique » 34. Dans son analyse de l’action philanthropique de Bill et Melinda Gates, il note qu’il n’existe aucune instance de contrôle sur ce que le couple peut faire, en dehors « de leurs propres ressources et désirs ». La journaliste Joanne Barkan a attiré l’attention sur ce problème fondamental des fondations philanthropiques privées, hors de tout contrôle démocratique : « Elles interviennent dans la vie publique mais ne rendent pas de comptes au public ; elles sont gouvernées en privé mais subventionnées publiquement en étant exonérées d’impôt » et « elles renforcent le problème de la ploutocratie – l’exercice du pouvoir dérivé de la richesse » 35.

Le fait que Howard Buffett puisse investir si librement en RDC est le produit direct du passé colonial dévastateur du pays 36 ainsi que de son assujettissement actuel au système néolibéral. L’économie de la RDC a été ravagée par trente-deux ans de kleptocratie soutenue par l’Occident, par les politiques d’ajustement structurel imposées par la Banque mondiale, l’extraction des ressources par des compagnies minières transnationales et l’élite politique congolaise, et une guerre qui a coûté la vie à des millions de personnes.

Buffett fait valoir que ses investissements sont nécessaires « parce que personne d’autre ne souhaite les faire » 37. Or nombreux⋅ses sont les citoyen·nes congolais·es qui aimeraient voir un secteur public renforcé plutôt que d’assister à sa marchandisation dans des investissements privés. Dans ce sens, beaucoup ont rejoint le mouvement social Lucha (« Lutte pour le changement ») qui a appelé le gouvernement à fournir à l’est de la RDC des services de base tels que l’eau courante et une infrastructure adéquate 38. Dans leur lutte pour l’accès aux ressources élémentaires et aux services publics, et pour pouvoir participer aux prises de décision politique, nombre des membres de Lucha ont été confronté⋅es à la répression et jeté⋅es en prison.

Le pouvoir du storytelling

La Fondation Howard G. Buffett sait présenter son travail avec soin. Des articles au sujet du RDC publiés dans des agences médiatiques réputées, y compris le Guardian et Al Jazeera, ont reçu le soutien de la Fondation Internationale des Femmes pour les Médias (IWMF), qui à son tour a reçu un financement de Buffett. Sa fondation contribue directement à l’Initiative de Rapport sur les Grands Lacs (Great Lakes Report Initiative) qui soutient les femmes journalistes travaillant en RDC, au Sud Soudan, au Rwanda, en Tanzanie, en Ouganda et en République Centrafricaine sur des questions liées à « l’autonomisation, la démocratie, la sécurité alimentaire et la préservation de l’environnement ». Cela semble être un projet bien nécessaire : à une époque où les médias font face à des déficits budgétaires croissants, l’IWMF offre des bourses généreuses aux journalistes à court d’argent. Je suis moi-même reconnaissante pour le soutien apporté par le financement que j’ai reçu de la part de l’association des Grands Lacs pour réaliser un reportage sur l’est du Congo, mais je me sens également mal à l’aise de savoir qui finance l’organisation.

L’IWMF insiste sur le fait qu’elle n’influence pas les récits des bénéficiaires de ses subventions et, dans une interview, a déclaré qu’elle trouvait « inacceptable qu’un bailleur de fonds influence le contenu éditorial des articles [qu’elle] soutient ». Cependant, leurs domaines de prédilection, en particulier la sécurité alimentaire et la préservation de l’environnement, sont choisis en partenariat avec la Fondation Howard G. Buffett.

Ironiquement, l’investissement de Buffett dans l’IWMF existe parallèlement à son soutien à une dictature qui a décimé sa presse locale. Comme le rapporte Anjan Sundaram dans The Guardian, le président rwandais Paul Kagame a tué, torturé, exilé et emprisonné des journalistes à travers le pays 39. Le Comité pour la protection des journalistes a documenté que dix-sept journalistes ont été tué⋅es au Rwanda depuis 1992. Pourtant, Buffett a qualifié le Rwanda de « pays le plus progressiste du continent » et, comme de nombreux donateurs occidentaux, il entretient une relation affinitaire avec son chef 40.

Jusqu’à présent, aucun des articles de l’IWMF publiés à partir du Rwanda n’offre une perspective critique sur le régime de Kagame. Jennifer Hyman, directrice des communications de l’organisation, a déclaré que son soutien aux journalistes étranger·es du Rwanda n’était pas contradictoire, étant donné le mandat de l’organisation de promouvoir la liberté de la presse ; et d’ajouter que l’organisation mène des formations au sein même des pays où elle opère. Pourtant, bien que l’organisation ait dénoncé énergiquement le traitement réservé aux journalistes en Colombie 41, au Bahreïn 42 et en Azerbaïdjan 43, Hyman n’a pas été en mesure de fournir la position de l’IWMF concernant le traitement réservé par le Rwanda à ses propres journalistes.

Un examen plus attentif des bailleurs de fonds de l’IWMF permet d’aller plus loin. Sur son site internet, parmi les donateurs de 2013 de l’organisation, on compte des multinationales comme le géant pharmaceutique Pfizer, qui a fait face à des accusations pour violation des droits du travail, des droits de la personne et pour abus environnementaux, notamment pour avoir utilisé des enfants nigériens au cours d’essais d’un médicament contre la méningite, ayant conduit à la mort de onze enfants 44. Walmart – connu pour ses pratiques de travail abusives 45 – a également contribué, tout comme Dole Food Company, à l’imposition de conditions de travail inhumaines et à l’exposition des travailleurs et travailleuses des plantations nicaraguayennes à un pesticide interdit 46. Les géants du pétrole Occidental Petroleum et Chevron, ainsi qu’Ivanka Trump (fille de Donald Trump), figurent également sur la liste des partisan·es de l’IWMF.

L’IWMF a précisé que cette liste ne constitue pas les donateurs et donatrices majeur·es, à l’exception de Chevron, de Bank of America et de la Buffett Foundation. Répondant aux questions sur l’apparente contradiction dans l’acceptation du soutien de ces entités, Hyman a répondu que la mission de l’IWMF était de « libérer le potentiel des femmes journalistes en tant que championnes de la liberté de la presse […]. Nous nous félicitons du soutien des entreprises, des fondations et des personnes qui croient en cette mission ».

Selon les mots de Behrooz Morvaridi, les organisations non gouvernementales, y compris à travers les médias, promeuvent les priorités des « philanthropes capitalistes d’élite » et contribuent ainsi « à la construction de l’agenda politique qu’elles soutiennent » 47. L’IMWF a réussi à remodeler les discours médiatiques dans la région des Grands Lacs, diversifiant ainsi la gamme d’articles de presse qui émergent de cette région et qui influencent l’opinion internationale. Cependant, en partenariat avec la Fondation Howard G. Buffett, elle a légitimé les activités de Buffett dans la région et son soutien au gouvernement rwandais.

Les révélations des Paradise Papers démontrent à quel point de vastes sommes de richesses sont détournées de pays comme la RDC 48. Il appartient aux journalistes d’interroger l’argent qui entre dans le pays provenant de la classe des milliardaires philanthro-capitalistes, et notamment des hommes comme Howard Buffett, dont la vision du développement régional – la privatisation comme voie de croissance – sape la lutte en cours dans laquelle les Congolais⋅es façonnent leur propre avenir.

  1. « Howard Buffett Bets on Hydropower to Rebuild Eastern Congo », Aaron Ross, Reuters, 20 août 2015. 
  2. « Virunga National Park and its Rangers. A Green Vision for Eastern Congo? », Simone Schlindwein, TAZ blog, 15 juin 2015. 
  3. Ibid. 
  4. Rapport annuel 2015, Howard G. Buffet Fondation. 
  5. Sur le type de philanthropie capitaliste élaborée par monsieur Windows, on lira : « Bill Gates Won’t Save Us », Ben Tarnoff, Jacobin, 15 août 2017. 
  6. « Capitalist Philanthropy and the New Green Revolution for Food Security », Behrooz Morvaridi, International Journal of Sociology of Agriculture & Food, vol. 19, no 2, 28 juin 2012. 
  7. Rapport annuel 2015, Howard G. Buffet Fondation. 
  8. « Philanthropic Power and Development.Who Shapes the Agenda? », Jens Martens et Karolin Seitz, Bischöfliches Hilfswerk MISEREOR, 2015. 
  9. À ce sujet, voir aussi « Seize the Charities », Patrick Stall, Jacobin, 21 déc. 2016. 
  10. À ce sujet, lire l’impressionnante enquête : « Retour social sur investissement. Quand les fondations d’entreprise refont le monde », Celia Izoard, Revue Z,no 11, 2018. 
  11. Voir «  The Philanthropy Hustle », Linsey McGoey, Jacobin, 10 nov. 2015. 
  12. « Capitalist Philanthropy and the New Green Revolution for Food Security », art. cité. 
  13. À ce sujet, voir « Pro Bono? On Philanthrocapitalism as Ideological Answer to InequalityThe Communism of Capital? », Mikkel Thorup, Ephemera: theory & politics in organization, 2013. 
  14. « Philanthropic Power and Development.Who shapes the agenda? », Jens Martens et Karolin Seitz, art. cité. 
  15. Voir « How to Escape the Present », Nicole M. Aschoff, Jacobin, 1er août 2017. 
  16. « The Land Grabbers », Linda Farthing, Jacobin, 2 fév. 2017. 
  17. « The Global Farmland Grab in 2016: How Big, How Bad? », GRAIN, 14 juin 2016. Voir aussi le dossier de CQFD no 133 sur la question : « Libérons les terres ! », juin 2015. 
  18. « Warren Buffett’s Son Disagrees With Bill Gates », Shira Ovide, The Wall Street Journal, 12 déc. 2011. 
  19. « 2,400 Seeds of Hope »Agra News, 19 août 2016. 
  20. « Software and Seeds: Lessons in Community Sharing », GRAIN, Roberto Verzola, 22 oct. 2005. 
  21. « Statement on the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA) », GRAIN. 
  22. « WEMA – Drought-Tolerant Maize for Sub-Sahara African Farmers », Monsanto Africa. 
  23. « Water Efficient Maize for Africa (WEMA) », Monsanto. 
  24. « Profiting from the Climate Crisis, Undermining Resilience in Africa:Gates and Monsanto’s Water Efficient Maize for Africa (WEMA) Project », African Centre for Biodiversity, avr. 2015. 
  25. « Nutrition Experts Alarmed by Nonprofit Downplaying Role of Junk Food in Obesity », Joanna Walters, The Guardian, 11 août 2015. 
  26. « Conagra Foods Appoints Howard G Buffett to Board of Directors », just-food.com, 28 janv. 2002. 
  27. « Public Authority and Conservation in Areas of Armed Conflict ; Virunga National Park as a State within a State in Eastern Congo », Esther Marijnen, Development & Change, Vol. 49 3, 12 Fév. 2018. 
  28. « Tension autour de la centrale hydroélectrique des Virunga », Esther Nsap, La Libre Afrique, 7 déc. 2017. 
  29. « Difficult Times for Virunga and its Hydropower Plants: Time to Get the Facts Right ! », Save Virunga, 18 déc. 2017. 
  30. « Risk Reward. The Howard G. Buffett Foundation 2012 annual report »
  31. « Letter Dated 12 November 2012 from the Chair of the Security Council Committee Established Pursuant to Resolution 1533 (2004) Concerning the Democratic Republic of the Congo Addressed to the President of the Security Council », Conseil de sécurité de l’ONU, 15 nov. 2015. 
  32. « US Foundation Faults Un Report on Congo », Eugène Kwibuka, The New Times, 2 avr. 2013. 
  33. « Philanthrocapitalism: A Self-Love Story. Why Do Super-Rich Activists Mock Their Critics Instead of Listening to Them? », David Rieff, The Nation, 1er oct. 2015. 
  34. « Counting on Billionaires », Japhy Wilson, Jacobin, 3 mars 2015. 
  35. « How to Criticize “Big Philanthropy” Effectively »Dissent Magazine, 16 avr. 2014. 
  36. Voir notamment une histoire de l’assassinat du leader politique révolutionnaire Lumumba : « Patrice Lumumba (1925–1961) », Sean Jacobs, Jacobin, 17 janvier 2017. 
  37. « Howard Buffett Bets On Hydropower to Rebuild Eastern Congo », Aaron Ross, art. cité. 
  38. « LUCHA: Youth Movement in Congo Demands Social Justice », Marta Iñiguez de Heredia, Pambazuka News, 30 oct. 2014. 
  39. « Bad News: Last Journalists in a Dictatorship Review – Rwanda’s ‘Big Brother’ », Ian Birrell, The Guardian, 11 janv. 2016. 
  40. Voir http://science.time.com/2013/12/19/q-and-a-with-rwandan-president-paul-kagame-and-howard-buffett/ et https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cep-h5kniq8
  41. « IWMF Condemns Killing of Colombian Journalist », International Women’s Media Foundation, 2 oct. 2015. 
  42. « Nazeeha Saeed – Raising Her Voice for Journalists in Bahrain »Ibid., 8 juil. 2014. 
  43. « IWMF calls for release of detained Azerbaijani journalist Khadija Ismayilova »Ibid. 1er sept. 2015 
  44. « Pfizer Pays Out to Nigerian Families of Meningitis Drug Trial Victims », David Smith, The Guardian, 12 août 2011. 
  45. « The Fight Against Walmart’s Labor Practices Goes Global », Michelle Chen, The Nation, 8 juin 2016. 
  46. « Costa Rica & Ecuador: Oxfam Reports on Labour Abuses & “Inhumane Conditions” in Pineapple & Banana Farms Sold in Germany », Fresh Fruit Portal, Business & Human Rights Resource Centre, 7 juin 2016. 
  47. « Capitalist Philanthropy and the New Green Revolution for Food Security », Behrooz Morvaridi, art. cité. 
  48. À ce sujet, voir par exemple : « How the Rich Stay Rich. An interview with Brooke Harrington », Doug Henwood, Jacobin, 20 nov. 2017. 

The Problem With Capitalist Philanthropy

Philanthropists like Howard Buffett are the darlings of journalists and the NGO world — but are they really helping Africa?

Jacobin Magazine, February 2018

In 2015, while on a reporting trip with the International Women’s Media Foundation (IWMF) in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), a local journalist told me, “It is difficult to go anywhere in the east of the country without touching one of Howard Buffett’s projects.”Indeed, having invested in a range of initiatives including hydroelectric power plants, road development, and eco-tourism, Howard Buffett is considerably involved in the east of the country. The photographer, farmer, sheriff, former director of the Coca-Cola Company, and son of the third richest man in the world, has poured millions into the region.The hydroelectric project was the first stage in an investment program the Congolese national parks authority (ICCN) and the Virunga Foundation, a British charity, drew up together. In 2015, Buffett reportedly pledged an additional $39 milliontoward two more power generation facilities, and the Virunga Foundation plans to fund more plants, hotels, and infrastructure projects around the park over the next years. In an interview with Reuters, the park’s director, Emmanuel de Merode, said that these initiatives, especially the power plants, will create employment opportunities for communities surrounding the park.And Buffett’s investments don’t stop there; across the border in Rwanda, his foundation stated in 2015 that it was investing $500 million over ten years in order to “transform” the country’s agriculture “into a more productive, high-value, and market-oriented sector.” So far, the foundation has focused on food security projects, with 67.5 percent of its 2015 contributionsfunding this sector.

These investments seem laudable. Who can object to improving food security in rural Rwanda or building hydroelectric plants in the DRC’s Kivu region, where basic infrastructure is limited and only about 3 percent of population has electricity? What better way to support the region than by funding power plants and preventing people from cutting down trees for charcoal?

To answer these questions, one must first ask: who exactly is Howard Buffett?

Capitalist Philanthropy and Its Discontents

Howard Buffett, like Bill Gates, belongs to the exclusive club of “capitalist philanthropists” who invest their wealth in solving the world’s major problems in areas like health and agriculture. The Howard G. Buffett Foundation’s mission statement explains that its investments “catalyze transformational change, particularly for the world’s most impoverished and marginalized populations.”

Although philanthropists say they’re helping the powerless, Jens Martens and Karoline Seitz have documented how charitable giving benefits the rich as well. Wealthy businessmen set up the very first American foundations at the beginning of the twentieth century to shield themselves from taxation, build prestige, and gain a voice in global affairs. Since then, philanthropists have come to occupy an increasingly dominant position in economic development, influencing governments and international organizations alike.

Capitalist philanthropists operate at the nexus of charity, capitalism, and development. As Behrooz Morvaridi writes, they are “politically and ideologically committed to a market approach.” By investing vast sums of money in solving complex historical problems, expanding the private sector, and investing in technical fixes, they advance the idea that capitalism is not the cause, but the solution, to the world’s troubles. In the words of historian Mikkel Thorup, capitalist philanthropy obscures the conflict between rich and poor, asserting instead that the rich are “the poor’s best and possibly only friend.”

But the problems capitalist philanthropists claim to be solving are rooted in the same economic system that allows them to generate such enormous wealth in the first place. Martens and Seitz showthat charitable giving represents “the other side of the coin of growing inequality between rich and poor”: they uncover a direct correlation between “increased wealth accumulation, regressive tax measures, and funding toward philanthropic activities.”

In her book No Is Not Enough, Naomi Klein writes that over the last two decades, elite liberals have been “looking to the billionaire class to solve the problems” that were formerly addressed “with collective action and a strong public sector.” Indeed, the solutions capitalist philanthropists propose in areas like health care, education, and agriculture erode public sector spending and shift the focus away from structural causes of poverty. In agriculture, structural barriers include trade-liberalization agreements that remove import tariffs and enable rich countries to buy products at a low cost, as well as the global rush for farmland, which, in 2016, translated into almost five hundred deals affecting thirty million hectares of land.

Buffett has criticized the imposition of the American model of industrial agriculture in Africa, which fellow philanthropists, like Bill Gates, advocate. Nevertheless, his investments in eastern Congo and Rwanda are designed to support market-oriented systems. He’s collaborated with Partners for Seed in Africa (PASA) and the Program for Africa’s Seed Systems (PASS), both of which support private seed companies that sell hybrid seeds and fertilizers to farmers, a process that has been criticized for undermining farmers’ age-old practices of openly saving, sharing, and exchanging seeds, and promoting seed diversity. Both programs are part of the controversial Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa, which smallholder farmers and livestock keepers from different African countries have criticized for promoting big business and “using intellectual property to establish corporate control over seeds.”

Along with Gates, Buffett has invested $47 million toward a project in partnership with Monsanto to develop water-efficient maize varieties for small-scale farmers. Critics have argued that the agro-giant is trying to shift the ownership of “maize breeding, seed production, and marketing … into the private sector,” thereby ensnaring “small-scale farmers into the adoption of hybrid maize varieties and their accompanying synthetic fertilizers and pesticides” that ultimately benefit seed and agrochemical companies.

Putting aside the irony of having someone who served on the board of directors of Coca-Cola — which funded researchers to downplay its dangerous health effects — decide how farmers in Africa should grow food, it’s worth remembering that Buffett also served on the board of directors for the food giant Conagra Foods, which has faced accusations of abusing labor and environmental codes.

Conservation is the other major priority area for Buffett. Some have described the Virunga National Park, a media darling that has an ongoing partnership with the Buffett Foundation, as a “state within a state”; although it protects the region’s biodiversity from poaching and oil exploration, it has also dispossessed the area’s original inhabitants of their land, and its paramilitary-trained rangers have reportedly mistreated indigenous communities on the park’s outskirts.

The park’s much-hyped hydroelectric plant, too, has stirred significant controversy lately, with some complaining that the price of electricity from the plant has exploded from $5 to $50 for basic household usage. These claims have been disputed by Save Virunga, a group that supports the Virunga National Park.

Buffett also financed peace talks between M23 rebels and the Congolese government in Uganda, a level of meddling that reveals how much influence philanthropists wield over political outcomes. When a UN Group of Experts report found that the Rwanda government was supporting the M23 rebels, Buffett argued against suspending aid to the country. Despite describing itself as a “non-political entity,” his foundation published a reportthat discredited the Group of Expert’s findings and questioned its experts’ reliability.

Indeed, David Rieff highlights how the philanthro-capitalist project is “irreducibly undemocratic,” if not “antidemocratic.” In his analysis of Bill and Melinda Gates, he notes that there is no check on what they can do, besides “their own resources and desires.” Joanne Barkan points out the problems with private philanthropic foundations: “they intervene in public life but aren’t accountable to the public; they are privately governed but publicly subsidized by being tax exempt” and “they reinforce the problem of plutocracy — the exercise of power derived from wealth.”

That Howard Buffett can invest so freely in the DRC is a product of the country’s devastating colonial past as well as its currentsubjugation to the neoliberal system. The DRC’s economy has been ravaged by thirty-two years of Mobutu’s Western-backed kleptocracy, World Bank–imposed structural adjustment policies, extraction by transnational mining companies and the Congolese political elite, and a war that took the lives of millions of people.

Buffett argues that his investments are necessary “because no one else is interested in doing it.” But there are numerous Congolese citizens who would like to see a strengthened public sector rather than private investment in services. Many have joined the social movement Lucha (“Lutte pour le changement”) which has been calling on the government to provide the eastern DRC with basic services like running water and proper infrastructure. In their struggle to see Congolese citizens’ material needs met and ensure they can participate in political decision-making, many of their members have faced repression and arrest.

The Power of Narrative

The Howard G. Buffett Foundation has presented its work carefully. Articles from the region published in reputable media agencies, including the Guardianand Al Jazeera, have received support from the International Women’s Media Foundation (IWMF), which in turn received funding from Buffett. His foundation directly contributes to the organization’s Great Lakes Reporting Initiative, which supports female journalists who work in the DRC, South Sudan, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda, and the Central Africa Republic on issues related to “empowerment, democracy, food security, and conservation efforts.”

This seems like a much-needed project: at a time when media outlets face growing budget shortfalls, the IWMF provides cash-strapped journalists with generous grants. I myself was grateful for the support I received from the Great Lakes fellowship to report from eastern Congo, but I also felt uncomfortable with the knowledge of who finances the organization.

The IWMF stresses that it does not influence its grant recipients’ stories, and in an interview said that they find it “unacceptable for a funder to influence the editorial content of the stories [they] facilitate.” However, their preferred areas of focus, particularly food security and conservation, are chosen in partnership with the Howard G. Buffett Foundation.

Ironically, Buffett’s investment in the IWMF exists alongside his support for a dictatorship that has decimated its local press. As Anjan Sundaram documents in Bad News, Rwandan president Paul Kagame has killed, tortured, exiled, and imprisoned journalists across the country. The Committee to Protect Journalists has documented that seventeen journalists have been killed in Rwanda since 1992. Yet Buffett has called Rwanda “the most progressive country on the continent,” and, like many Western donors, enjoys a cozy relationship with its leader.

So far, none of the IWMF articles published from Rwanda offer a critical perspective on the Kagame regime. Jennifer Hyman, the organization’s communications director, said that their support for foreign journalists reporting from Rwanda was not contradictory given the organization’s mandate to promote press freedom and that the organization conducts in-country training for local reporters in the countries where they work. Yet, although the organization has been vocal in condemning the treatment of journalists in ColombiaBahrain, and Azerbaijan, Hyman was unable to state the IWMF’s position regarding Rwanda’s treatment of its own journalists.

A closer look at the IWMF’s funders offers further insights. On its website, the organization’s 2013 donors include multinational companies like pharmaceutical giant Pfizer, which has faced charges of labor, human rights, and environmental abuses, including using Nigerian children to test an anti-meningitis drug that led to the deaths of eleven children. Walmart — notorious for its exploitative labor practices — also contributed, as did Dole Food Company, accused of enforcing inhumane working conditions and exposing Nicaraguan plantation workers to a banned pesticide. Oil giants Occidental Petroleum and Chevron, as well as Donald Trump’s daughter, Ivanka, also appear on the IWMF’s list of supporters.

The IWMF clarified that this list does not constitute major donors, with the exception of Chevron, Bank of America, and the Buffett Foundation. In response to queries about the apparent contradiction in accepting support from these entities, while at the same focusing on issues around empowerment and democracy in the Great Lakes Region, Hyman responded that IWMF’s mission is to “unleash the potential of women journalists as champions of press freedom … we welcome the support of corporations, foundations, and individuals who believe in that mission.”

In Morvaridi’s words , organizations, including the media, promote the priorities of “elite capitalist philanthropists” and thereby “contribute to the building of the political agenda they support.” The IMWF has successfully reshaped mainstream media narratives in the Great Lakes region, diversifying the range of stories that emerge from that area and influencing international opinion. However, in partnering with the Howard G. Buffett Foundation, it has legitimized Buffett’s activities in the region and his support for the Rwandan government.

Recent revelations from the Paradise Papers demonstrate the extent to which vast sums of wealth are being siphoned from countries like the DRC. It is up to journalists to interrogate the money that enters the country from the billionaire philanthro-capitalist class, and in particular, from men like Howard Buffett, whose vision for regional development — privatization as a path to growth — undermines the ongoing struggle of ordinary Congolese to shape their own future.

Book Chapter: All that Glitters

Book Chapter: ‘All that Glitters: Neoliberal Violence, Small-Scale Mining and Gold Extraction in Northern Tanzania’

In Against Colonization and Rural Dispossession: Local Resistance in South and East Asia, the Pacific and Africa. Ed Dip Kapoor.

August 2017

Overview

Under the guise of ‘development’, a globalizing capitalism has continued to cause poverty through dispossession and the exploitation of labour across the Global South. This process has been met with varied forms of rural resistance by local movements of displaced farm workers, small and landless (women) peasants, and indigenous peoples in South and East Asia, the Pacific and Africa, who are resisting the forced appropriation of their land, the exploitation of labour and the destruction of their ecosystems and ways of life.

Continue reading “Book Chapter: All that Glitters”

Global atlas of environmental conflicts

EJOLT, 2012

Role: Research

Across the world communities are struggling to defend their land, air, water, forests and their livelihoods from damaging projects and extractive activities with heavy environmental and social impacts: mining, dams, tree plantations, fracking, gas flaring, incinerators, etc. As resources needed to fuel our economy move through the commodity chain from extraction, processing and disposal, at each stage environmental impacts are externalized onto the most marginalized populations. Often this all takes place far from the eyes of concerned citizens or consumers of the end-products.

The EJ Atlas collects these stories of communities struggling for environmental justice from around the world. The atlas is a visually attractive and interactive online mapping platform detailing environmental conflicts. It allows users to search and filter across 100 fields and to browse by commodity, company, country and type of conflict. With one click you can find a global snapshot of nuclear, waste or water conflicts, or the places where communities have an issue with a particular mining or chemical company.

Global Atlas of Environmental Conflicts

Kenya’s Civil Society & Extractive Industries: Buying into Neoliberalism?

CODESRIA Newsletter, January 2014

In November of last year, civil society organizations hosted a seminar on the extractive industries in Kenya. Titled ‘Kenya’s New Natural Resource Discoveries: Blessing or Curse?’ and organized with the aim of addressing potential opportunities, challenges, impacts and policy implications of Kenya’s newly discovered resources, including oil, this was a rare opportunity to have an open and informed debate about the implications of mining, oil and resource extraction in the country.

Continue reading “Kenya’s Civil Society & Extractive Industries: Buying into Neoliberalism?”

The DRC’s Economic War

Undergraduate thesis, June 2007

McGill University
Montreal, Canada.

Excerpt:

In Joseph Conrad’s ‘Heart of Darkness,’ first published in 1899 and years later subject to a polemical but much-needed critique by one of Africa’s most prolific writers, King Leopold’s colonial project in the Congo is described as ‘the vilest scramble for loot that ever disfigured the history of human conscience.’ More than a century later, after a protracted war in which an estimated 4.2 million citizens perished and the nation’s stability was invested in the UN’s largest peacekeeping force to date, Conrad’s oft-repeated phrase is, tragically, just as pertinent.

Continue reading “The DRC’s Economic War”